Limoncello

Yup, its Everclear but it'll get thinned out by adding water later.

Yup, its Everclear but it’ll get thinned out by adding water later.

I had a nice surprise this week.

A neighbor knocked on my door and told me that during his bike rides around the neighborhood, he’d been admiring my orange tree that is full of big, juicy oranges.  He asked if they were good and would I allow him to grab a few.  I told to him to grab as many as he likes however,  although they look delicious, they are quite sour. I told him that I used the sour juice to marinate pork or chicken but that they were way too sour to just make juice to drink.

He said that he makes limoncello but had been wanting to give ‘orangecello’ a try.  That started a whole discussion about the recipe that he uses to make his liqueur. I was actually interested in trying to make some too.  I had come across a recipe in a magazine recently and thought that it had too much sugar in it for me but still, I wanted to try making it.  He said he felt the same so he uses his own honey from the bees he keeps on some land outside of town.

A bunch of naked lemons. Boy did it smell good!

A bunch of naked lemons. Boy did it smell good!

Then he made me an offer that set me into action.  He offered to trade me lemons that he had just picked from his own tree for oranges that I had on mine.  He also offered to bring me a bottle of his orangecello when it was ready!  What a nice surprise.

That did it.  I decided to make limoncello out of his lemons.  I did have to add a few store bought lemons too, but the majority were his.

After searching through several on-line recipes I found that they all were pretty much the same, so I decided to follow this one. (Limoncello recipe).  The peel stays in the bottle for 10 to 40 days.

Carefully tested lemon peel sits in the bottom of the grain alcohol for 10 - 40 days.

Carefully tested lemon peel sits in the bottom of the grain alcohol for 10 – 40 days.

Then I’ll strain and filter it and finally add the sugar water for final bottling. (I decided to follow the traditional formula first. I’ll try using honey next). It then sits in the freezer until ready to serve 40 days after that.  It’s served ice cold in little cordial glasses as a digestive after dinner.

It should be ready just in time for Summer!

About Wayne to the Max

Active writer, dancer, traveler, Christian and father, aviation enthusiast, photographer, music lover and a DJ, hiker, Harley driver and fine wine drinker. My digital photo artist page: www.WayneToTheMax.com
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